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Sunday, February 5, 2023

Why Lufthansa is now launching a recruitment offensive

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FRANKFURT — Lufthansa’s takeover got off to a rocky start. Over the summer, the crane canceled 6,000 flights, but it has the situation under control at the hubs: Lufthansa expects stability in flight operations. Despite the gloomy economic outlook and inflation, Lufthansa is again massively recruiting staff.

Lufthansa has control of the flight plan again. “The bottom has been crossed, flight operations have largely stabilized,” Lufthansa board member Christina Foerster told Funke Group Newspapers. “Despite the many painful flight schedule cancellations, we are flying 95% of our entire summer flight schedule.”

According to Foerster, most short-term flight cancellations relate to domestic German routes. “99% of all holiday flights take place,” the board member said. Only the persistently high level of sick leave is causing further problems for Lufthansa – Foerster does not expect the system to ease significantly before the end of October.

During the crisis, Lufthansa cut 30,000 jobs in the group. Now Lufthansa is hiring again. In the second half, Lufthansa will hire 5,000 “net” new employees, Lufthansa CEO Carsten Spohr announced last week in Frankfurt, and Lufthansa plans to hire the same number of new employees in 2023.

In flight operations in particular – in the cabin and cockpit – Lufthansa wants to ease the strained personnel situation with new hires, despite recession fears.

Because in Frankfurt, despite high inflation and the threat of a global economic slowdown, business is expected to grow in 2023 – and up to 90% of passenger capacity from 2019 must be restored. In the meantime, Lufthansa had even promised a return to 95% of pre-crisis capacity.

Lufthansa expects impulses from the Far East

“Inflation is one of the reasons we’re cautious,” Spohr said. The group expects self-payer demand to stabilize slightly in 2023 – but at the same time offset impulses from Asia. “Japan is opening up again, China at least partially,” Spohr predicted.

As companies expand their global supply chains due to the crisis, Lufthansa also expects high business class occupancy rates in 2023. “Business travelers are coming back,” Spohr said. Currently, premium classes are just as good and sometimes even busier than economy.

© aero.de | Illustration: Lufthansa | 08/08/2022 07:41



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Published on 08/08/2022 – 8:35 p.m.

They are now sitting at home receiving up to 60% of their last salary as a transition allowance until they retire and LH must fund this from their current earnings. For only 40% more money the pilots would have flown 100% and it’s cheaper than a newly trained pilot. All in all, at least a zero-sum game, if not a loss for LH.

That’s how it was, the extra severance pay was just butter on the cake anyway.
Now just pray that the store does not go bankrupt, because the ÜV is not protected against insolvency

If that had worried you, you would have simply forgone the severance package and opted for plan B. It would then be protected against insolvency. Provided, however, that you no longer need your pilot’s license. The people concerned will have already had this on their screens.

Message of 08/08/2022 – 15:57

They are now sitting at home receiving up to 60% of their last salary as a transition allowance until they retire and LH must fund this from their current earnings. For only 40% more money the pilots would have flown 100% and it’s cheaper than a newly trained pilot. All in all, at least a zero-sum game, if not a loss for LH.

That’s how it was, the extra severance pay was just butter on the cake anyway.
Now just pray that the store does not go bankrupt, because the ÜV is not protected against insolvency

Message of 08/08/2022 – 15:39

A lot of half-truths are mixed in here. The LH threatened to fire the pilots. It would probably only have affected young service pilots after social selection, since anyone who has been at LH for more than 15 years cannot be fired. If you had then wanted to start dismissing the co-pilots, the industrial tribunal would have had its say. It was therefore necessary to make offers of compensation, and to accept them favorably for those who had them and could afford them. That it is now cheap for LH to let its “most expensive” drivers go is nonsense. They are now sitting at home receiving up to 60% of their last salary as a transition allowance until they retire and LH must fund this from their current earnings. For only 40% more money the pilots would have flown 100% and it’s cheaper than a newly trained pilot. All in all, at least a zero-sum game, if not a loss for LH.
Many might have done a longer flight, but they were offered nothing but normal pay and the risk of being unfit to fly during the extended period, which they had to bear themselves. In this case, the pilot should have waived his severance pay. So why should you extend? In this regard, LH was not an extension “offer”, but a public relations program of the type: “We tried everything”.

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