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Sunday, May 29, 2022

Album of the Week: Charli XCX News, Rosalía, Doherty, Cypress Hill

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Albums of the Week: Undefined

Peter Doherty and Frédéric Lo – “The Fantastic Life of Poetry and Crime”

There are people who try drugs once in their life and end up in a parallel universe for a long time. And there are people like Peter Doherty: Exactly the other way around, he took his first real break from drugs in 20 years the summer before last and suddenly got to know the world from a different side. With a clear head she met the French musician frederick lo, the two began to write songs together, Lo the music, Doherty the lyrics. Thus the enchanting album “The Fantasy Life of Poetry & Crime” (Straps Originals) was born in a lonely old house in France. Doherty sings tender lines full of rapt melancholy, the music breathes the spirit of the 60’s, there’s a lot of chanson blowing through it, it even goes in the direction of musical theatre, violins, some melancholy wind instruments in the background. In the understated orchestral “The Ballad Of…” Neil Hannon (Divine Comedy) and Rufus Wainwright feel comfortable. Then again Bänkelsänger-Pop with acoustic guitar, lovely très, especially the spring song “Keeping Me On File”. And the detoxed Doherty sounds centered and focused like never before. What a beautiful album, what a beautiful surprise. max fellman

Albums of the Week: Undefined

All the Witches – “Live on the Internet”

all the witches is one of those bands whose music really needs to be played live in stuffy clubs where it’s too small, too dark, and most of all, too loud. The Nashville quartet plays what is often called “Stoner Rock”, a bit of a stupid category, but please, for the sake of simplicity, stoner rock: a lot black sabbath in it, a lot of electric guitar storms, riffs that turn into an endless thrashing, everything sounds extremely long, dark and great. The band really wanted to play a lot of concerts in the last few years, but they all fell victim to the pandemic, so there was only one studio session, but at least it was streamed live on the internet. The recording is now available as an album, “Live On The Internet” (V2), and despite the circumstances, it’s pretty powerful. If you open these songs real loud at home and dim the lights and go around in circles for a while, then… well, at least you can almost imagine what it’s going to be like again at some point, such a booming crowd. in a basement too narrow, too dark, too noisy. max fellman

Albums of the Week: Undefined

Charlie XCX – “Crash”

The fifth studio album charlie xcx Sounds like double self-harm. Built on the edge of the abyss in terms of content, it speaks of turbulence, sex and unhealthy separations. Musically, it goes two steps further: while Charli XCX’s music so far only pointed to the future, she too looks back on “Crash” (Atlantic) for the first time. In other words, the former pop queen of the future openly uses music history to poke around. On “Good Ones,” the ’80s survive on a dance-crazy bassline. A five-tone keyboard floats through “Every Rule” as Angelo Badalamenti’s “Twin Peaks” soundtrack once did. And even for Britneys Spears, Charli XCX’s greatest heroine, she raises a monument to her with the sighing and lascivious “Baby.” Its otherwise typical complexity can only be found in more understated songs like “Lightning”. By the way, it is the last album in the contract with the main label Atlantic. Which will intentionally disappoint some fan expectations because it targets the mainstream like never before and is one of a kind. Timo Posselt

Albums of the Week: Undefined

Cypress Hill – “Back in Black”

In one of the many nostalgic articles about the ongoing revival of the 1990s, it was recently read that the decade at the time was essentially characterized in pop culture terms by Tamagotchi, donkey horns, nirvana and techno. Can you sign something like this? But it’s also possible that while you’re trying to piece together the lyrics to “Smells Like Teen Spirit,” a shrill, muppet-style voice keeps singing in the back of your mind that it’s “Insane In The Brain.” the blow of cypress hill – and most of all: this brain-piercing wailing voice – was at least as ubiquitous at the time as the unfortunate back tattoos. And today? Kurt Cobain is no longer alive, the techno greats of yesteryear are all cultural advisers or something, only Cypress Hill is still around and doing…well, still doing the exact same thing. On the new album “Back In Black” (BMG Rights/Warner) there are drum loops you think you know from the debut (which came out in 1991!), over which Californians screech the same we-super-you-not- rants as before. Hip-hop, which has spent the last 20 years completely without a trace. But why blame middle-aged gentlemen for seizing the moment? If the revival is right now, then take a few bucks with you right now. max fellman

Albums of the Week: Undefined

Rosalia – “Motomami”

Of course, no one can understand that anymore. Actually it is not possible. There is Rosalía dismantled alias of Vila Tobella rosalia from Catalonia after flamenco in “Motomami” (Sony Music) finally the traditional music of Latin America. Oh, what do you mean disassembled? It’s more like shredding. Electronic beats echo in ballad-like soprano overtures, stumbling, catching, stumbling, spinning, face-slamming uncontrollably onto the asphalt, and then just gliding smoothly. Reggaeton blasts mariachi horns to the bone, synths cut through what’s left on stage, autotune vocals sweep the rest. And in the end everything still sounds quite traditional, coherent and logical as something natural. At least a great pop sensation. Jacob Biazza

Albums of the Week: Undefined

Helmut – “My Interstellar Love Life”

About the stage name Helmut one can argue. Some automatically think of Kohl, others of the helpless cabbie from Jim Jarmusch’s “Night On Earth.” But don’t let that distract you, Berlin musician Adrian Schull is now releasing his album “My Interstellar Love Life” (Wordandsound) as Helmut, and thankfully that sounds less like the CDU and more like an indie movie: Cautious Living Room Pop Miniatures , restrained percussions, warm synthesizer chords, the singing never so loud as to disturb the neighbors. There’s a touch of old Berlin pop wave, a bit in the middle Alt Jand if you like you can also have a long-distance relationship Bon Iver listen. Playful, friendly and very suitable for the first sunny afternoons on the windowsill. max fellman


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